Outside Resources Requirements for Minnesota Nursing Homes

When Outside Resources are Required for Minnesota Nursing Homes
When Outside Resources are Required for Minnesota Nursing Homes

Minnesota Requirements for Outside Resources When Needed in Nursing Homes

According to Minnesota Administrative Rule 4658.0075 OUTSIDE RESOURCES, if a nursing home does not employ a qualified professional person to furnish a specific service to be provided by the nursing home, the nursing home must have that service furnished to residents under a written agreement with a person or agency outside the nursing home. The written agreement must specify that the service meets professional standards and principles that apply to professionals providing services in a nursing home, and that the service meets the same standards as required by this chapter.

Use of Outside Resources is Common

Many nursing homes and other care providers use outside resources for many of their caregivers including contract doctors and nursing practitioners, temporary nursing staff, nursing aides, medication administration, feeding assistance and others.  It is critical that staff not familiar with the residents and their care needs have access to policies and procedures, resident information and are supervised and assisted by other well trained and credentialed staff.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about Minnesota nursing home outside resources requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Minnesota Quality Assessment and Assurance Regulations for Nursing Homes

Nursing Homes are Required to Perform Quality Assessment and Assurance
Nursing Homes are Required to Perform Quality Assessment and Assurance

Minnesota Quality Assessment and Assurance Rules

According to Minnesota Administrative Rule 4658.0070 QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND ASSURANCE COMMITTEE, a nursing home must maintain a quality assessment and assurance committee consisting of the administrator, the director of nursing services, the medical director or other physician designated by the medical director, and at least three other members of the nursing home’s staff, representing disciplines directly involved in resident care. The quality assessment and assurance committee must identify issues with respect to which quality assurance activities are necessary and develop and implement appropriate plans of action to correct identified quality deficiencies. The committee must address, at a minimum, incident and accident reporting, infection control, and medications and pharmacy services.

Under the federal regulations, the nursing home must:

• Have sufficient nursing staff. (42 CFR §483.30)

• Conduct initially a comprehensive and accurate assessment of each resident’s functional capacity. (42 CFR §483.20)

• Develop a comprehensive care plan for each resident. (42 CFR §483.20)

• Prevent the deterioration of a resident’s ability to bathe, dress, groom, transfer and ambulate, toilet, eat, and to communicate. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Provide, if a resident is unable to carry out activities of daily living, the necessary services to maintain good nutrition, grooming, and personal oral hygiene. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Ensure that residents receive proper treatment and assistive devices to maintain vision and hearing abilities. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Ensure that residents do not develop pressure sores and, if a resident has pressure sores, provide the necessary treatment and services to promote healing, prevent infection, and prevent new sores from developing. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Provide appropriate treatment and services to incontinent residents to restore as much normal bladder functioning as possible. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Ensure that the resident receives adequate supervision and assistive devices to prevent accidents. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Maintain acceptable parameters of nutritional status. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Provide each resident with sufficient fluid intake to maintain proper hydration and health. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Ensure that residents are free of any significant medication errors. (42 CFR §483.25)

• Promote each resident’s quality of life. (42 CFR §483.15)

• Maintain dignity and respect of each resident. (42 CFR §483.15)

• Ensure that the resident has the right to choose activities, schedules, and health care. (42 CFR §483.40)

• Provide pharmaceutical services to meet the needs of each resident. (42 CFR §483.60)

• Be administered in a manner that enables it [the nursing home] to use its resources effectively and efficiently. (42 CFR §483.75)

• Maintain accurate, complete, and easily accessible clinical records on each resident. (42 CFR §483.75)

One of the best ways to check the past history of federal care deficiencies for a facility is to check the Medicare / Medicare CMS website called Nursing Home Compare http://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about Minnesota nursing home quality assessment and assurance requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Resident Safety and Disaster Planning Rules

Nursing Home Safety and Disaster Planning Regulations
Nursing Home Safety and Disaster Planning Regulations

Minnesota Nursing Home Safety and Disaster Planning Requirements

Pursuant to Minnesota Administrative Rule 4658.0065 RESIDENT SAFETY AND DISASTER PLANNING. Subpart 1. Safety program. A nursing home must develop and implement an organized safety program in accordance with a written safety plan. The written plan must be included in the orientation and in-service training programs of all employees and volunteers to ensure safety of residents at all times.

Additional Disaster Prevention Rules

Subp. 2. Security of physical plant. A nursing home must have a method of ensuring the security of exit doors leading directly to the outside which are not under direct observation from the nurses’ station.

Subp. 3. Written disaster plan. A nursing home must have a written disaster plan specific to the nursing home with procedures for the protection and evacuation of all persons in the case of fire or explosion or in the event of floods, tornadoes, or other emergencies. The plan must include information and procedures about the location of alarm signals and fire extinguishers, frequency of drills, assignments of specific tasks and responsibilities of the personnel on each shift, persons and local emergency departments to be notified, precautions and safety measures during tornado alerts, procedures for evacuation of all persons during fire or floods, planned evacuation routes from the various floor areas to safe areas within the building, or from the building when necessary, and arrangements for temporary emergency housing in the community in the event of total evacuation.

Subp. 4. Availability of disaster plan. Copies of the disaster plan containing the basic emergency procedures must be posted at all nurses’ stations, kitchens, laundries, and boiler rooms. Complete copies of the detailed disaster plan must be available to all supervisory personnel.

Subp. 5. Drills. Residents do not need to be evacuated during a drill except when an evacuation drill is planned in advance.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about Minnesota nursing safety and disaster planning requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Administrator of Nursing Homes Minnnesota Rules

Rules for Nursing Home Administrator in Minnesota
Rules for Nursing Home Administrator in Minnesota

Rules for Administrator of Minnesota Nursing Homes

According to Minnesota Administrative Rule 4658.0055 ADMINISTRATOR.Subpart 1. Designation. A nursing home must designate a licensed nursing home administrator to be in immediate charge of the operation and administration of the nursing home, whether that individual is the licensee or a person designated by the licensee. The individual must have authority to carry out the provisions of this chapter and must be charged with the responsibility of doing so.

Subp. 2. [Repealed, L 2001 c 69 s 2]

Rules for Absence of Administrator

Subp. 3. Administrator’s absence; requirements. The administrator must not leave the premises without delegating authority to a person who is at least 21 years of age and capable of acting in an emergency and without giving information as to where the administrator can be reached. At no time may a nursing home be left without competent supervision. The person left in charge must have the authority to act in an emergency.

Subp. 4. Notice of person in charge. The name of the person in charge at the time must be posted at the main entrance of the nursing home.

Duties for Administrator

According to Minnesota Administrative Rules 4658.0060 RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, the administrator is responsible for the:

A. maintenance, completion, and submission of reports and records as required by the department;

B. formulation of written policies, procedures, and programs for operation, management, and maintenance of the nursing home;

C. current personnel records for each employee according to part 4658.0130;

D. written job descriptions for all positions which define responsibilities, duties, and qualifications that are readily available for all employees;

E. work assignments consistent with qualifications and the work load;

F. maintenance of a weekly time schedule which shows each employee’s name, job title, hours of work, and days off for each day of the week. The schedule must be dated and communicated to employees. The schedules and time cards, payroll records, or other written documentation of actual time worked and paid for must be kept on file in the home for three years;

G. orientation for new employees and volunteers and provision of a continuing in-service education program for all employees and volunteers to give assurance that they understand the proper method of carrying out all procedures;

H. establishment of a recognized accounting system; and

I. the development and maintenance of channels of communications with employees, including:

(1) distribution of written personnel policies to employees;

(2) regularly scheduled meetings of supervisory personnel;

(3) an employee suggestion system; and

(4) employee evaluation.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home administrator and licensing requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Licensee Requirements for Operators of Nursing Homes

Nursing Home Licensee Rules and Requirements
Nursing Home Licensee Rules and Requirements

Nursing Home Licensee Requirements

Pursuant to Minnesota Administrative Rules, 4658.0050 LICENSEE. Subpart 1. General duties. The licensee of a nursing home is responsible for its management, control, and operation. A nursing home must be managed, controlled, and operated in a manner that enables it to use its resources effectively and efficiently to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident.

Subp. 2. Specific duties. The licensee must develop written bylaws or policies for the management and operation of the nursing home and for the provision of resident care, which must be available to all members of the governing body, and must assume legal responsibility for matters under its control, for the quality of care rendered and for compliance with laws and rules relating to the safety and sanitation of nursing homes, or which otherwise relate directly to the health, welfare, and care of residents.

Responsibilities for Minnesota Nursing Home Licensee

Subp. 3. Responsibilities. A licensee is responsible for the duties in items A to F.

A. Full disclosure of each person having an interest of ten percent or more of the ownership of the home to the department with any change reported in writing within 14 days after the licensee knew of or should have known of the transfer, whichever occurs first. In case of corporate ownership, the name and address of each officer and director must be specified. If the home is organized as a partnership, the name and address of each partner must be furnished. In the case of a home operated by a lessee, the persons or business entities having an interest in the lessee organization must be reported and an executed copy of the lease agreement furnished. If the home is operated by the holder of a franchise, disclosure must be made as to the franchise holder who must also furnish an executed copy of the franchise agreement.

B. Appointment of a licensed nursing home administrator who is responsible for the operation of the home in accordance with law and established policies and whose authority to serve as administrator is delegated in writing.

C. Notification of the termination of service of the administrator and the appointment of a replacement within five working days in writing to the department. If a licensed nursing home administrator is not available to assume the position immediately, notification to the department must include the name of the person temporarily in charge of the home. The governing body of a nursing home must not employ an individual as the permanent administrator until it is determined that the individual qualifies for licensure as a nursing home administrator in Minnesota under Minnesota Statutes, section 144A.04. The governing body of the nursing home must not employ an individual as an acting administrator or person temporarily in charge for more than 30 days unless that individual has secured an acting administrator license, as required by Minnesota Statutes, section 144A.27.

D. Provision of an adequate and competent staff and maintenance of professional standards in the care of residents and operation of the nursing home.

E. Provision of facilities, equipment, and supplies for care consistent with the needs of the residents.

F. Provision of evidence of adequate financing, proper administration of funds, and the maintenance of required statistics. A nursing home must have financial resources at the time of initial licensure to permit full service operation of the nursing home for six months without regard to income from resident fees.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about Minnesota nursing home licensee requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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