Competency Evaluation Requirements for Nursing Aides

Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation Requirements for Nursing Homes
Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation Requirements for Nursing Homes

Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation Federal Regulation

Pursuant to federal regulations including 42 CFR § 483.151, state review and approval of nurse aide training and competency evaluation programs.

(a) State review and administration. (1) The State—

(i) Must specify any nurse aide training and competency evaluation programs that the State approves as meeting the requirements of §483.152 and/or competency evaluations programs that the State approves as meeting the requirements of §483.154; and

(ii) May choose to offer a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program that meets the requirements of §483.152 and/or a competency evaluation program that meets the requirements of §483.154.

(2) If the State does not choose to offer a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program, the State must review and approve or disapprove nurse aide training and competency evaluation programs and nurse aide competency evaluation programs upon request.

(3) The State survey agency must in the course of all surveys, determine whether the nurse aide training and competency evaluation requirements of §§483.35(c) and (d) and 483.95(g) are met.

(b) Requirements for approval of programs. (1) Before the State approves a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program, the State must—

(i) Determine whether the nurse aide training and competency evaluation program meets the course requirements of §483.152:

(ii) Determine whether the nurse aide competency evaluation program meets the requirements of §483.154; and

(iii) In all reviews other than the initial review, visit the entity providing the program.

(2) The State may not approve a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program offered by or in a facility which, in the previous two years—

(i) In the case of a skilled nursing facility, has operated under a waiver under section 1819(b)(4)(C)(ii)(II) of the Act;

(ii) In the case of a nursing facility, has operated under a waiver under section 1919(b)(4)(C)(ii) of the Act that was granted on the basis of a demonstration that the facility is unable to provide nursing care required under section 1919(b)(4)(C)(i) of the Act for a period in excess of 48 hours per week;

(iii) Has been subject to an extended (or partial extended) survey under sections 1819(g)(2)(B)(i) or 1919(g)(2)(B)(i) of the Act;

(iv) Has been assessed a civil money penalty described in section 1819(h)(2)(B)(ii) of 1919(h)(2)(A)(ii) of the Act of not less than $5,000 as adjusted annually under 45 CFR part 102; or

(v) Has been subject to a remedy described in sections 1819(h)(2)(B) (i) or (iii), 1819(h)(4), 1919(h)(1)(B)(i), or 1919(h)(2)(A) (i), (iii) or (iv) of the Act.

(3) A State may not, until two years since the assessment of the penalty (or penalties) has elapsed, approve a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program offered by or in a facility that, within the two-year period beginning October 1, 1988—

(i) Had its participation terminated under title XVIII of the Act or under the State plan under title XIX of the Act;

(ii) Was subject to a denial of payment under title XVIII or title XIX;

(iii) Was assessed a civil money penalty of not less than $5,000 as adjusted annually under 45 CFR part 102 for deficiencies in nursing facility standards;

(iv) Operated under temporary management appointed to oversee the operation of the facility and to ensure the health and safety of its residents; or

(v) Pursuant to State action, was closed or had its residents transferred.

Nursing Competency Evaluation Waiver of Disapproval

(c) Waiver of disapproval of nurse aide training programs. (1) A facility may request that CMS waive the disapproval of its nurse aide training program when the facility has been assessed a civil money penalty of not less than $5,000 as adjusted annually under 45 CFR part 102 if the civil money penalty was not related to the quality of care furnished to residents in the facility.

(2) For purposes of this provision, “quality of care furnished to residents” means the direct hands-on care and treatment that a health care professional or direct care staff furnished to a resident.

(3) Any waiver of disapproval of a nurse aide training program does not waive any requirement upon the facility to pay any civil money penalty.

(d) Time frame for acting on a request for approval. The State must, within 90 days of the date of a request under paragraph (a)(3) of this section or receipt of additional information from the requester—

(1) Advise the requester whether or not the program has been approved; or

(2) Request additional information form the requesting entity.

(e) Duration of approval. The State may not grant approval of a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program for a period longer than 2 years. A program must notify the State and the State must review that program when there are substantive changes made to that program within the 2-year period.

(f) Withdrawal of approval. (1) The State must withdraw approval of a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or nurse aide competency evaluation program offered by or in a facility described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(2) The State may withdraw approval of a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or nurse aide competency evaluation program if the State determines that any of the applicable requirements of §483.152 or §483.154 are not met by the program.

(3) The State must withdraw approval of a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or a nurse aide competency evaluation program if the entity providing the program refuses to permit unannounced visits by the State.

(4) If a State withdraws approval of a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program—

(i) The State must notify the program in writing, indicating the reason(s) for withdrawal of approval of the program.

(ii) Students who have started a training and competency evaluation program from which approval has been withdrawn must be allowed to complete the course.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nurse aide training requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Aide Waiver Regulations for Nursing Homes

Federal Regulations Pertaining to Nursing Aide Waiver
Federal Regulations Pertaining to Nursing Aide Waiver

Federal Requirements Concerning Nursing Aide Waiver

According to federal regulation 42 CFR § 483.150, statutory basis; Deemed meeting or nursing aide waiver of requirements.

(a) Statutory basis. This subpart is based on sections 1819(b)(5), 1819(f)(2), 1919(b)(5), and 1919(f)(2) of the Act, which establish standards for training nurse-aides and for evaluating their competency.

(b) Deemed meeting of requirements. A nurse aide is deemed to satisfy the requirement of completing a training and competency evaluation approved by the State if he or she successfully completed a training and competency evaluation program before July 1, 1989 if—

(1) The aide would have satisfied this requirement if—

(i) At least 60 hours were substituted for 75 hours in sections 1819(f)(2) and 1919(f)(2) of the Act, and

(ii) The individual has made up at least the difference in the number of hours in the program he or she completed and 75 hours in supervised practical nurse aide training or in regular in-service nurse aide education;
or

(2) The individual was found to be competent (whether or not by the State) after the completion of nurse aide training of at least 100 hours duration.

Aide Waiver Requirements Continued

(c) Waiver of requirements. A State may—

(1) Waive the requirement for an individual to complete a competency evaluation program approved by the State for any individual who can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the State that he or she has served as a nurse aide at one or more facilities of the same employer in the state for at least 24 consecutive months before December 19, 1989; or

(2) Deem an individual to have completed a nurse aide training and competency evaluation program approved by the State if the individual completed, before July 1, 1989, such a program that the State determines would have met the requirements for approval at the time it was offered

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing aide waiver regulations and requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Training Requirements for Nursing Homes

Nursing Home Training Requirements Contained in Federal Regulation
Nursing Home Training Requirements Contained in Federal Regulation

Nursing Home Training Requirements in Federal Regulation

Pursuant to federal regulations contained in 42 CFR § 483.95, training requirements.  A facility must develop, implement, and maintain an effective training program for all new and existing staff; individuals providing services under a contractual arrangement; and volunteers, consistent with their expected roles. A facility must determine the amount and types of training necessary based on a facility assessment as specified at §483.70(e). Training topics must include but are not limited to—

(a) Communication. A facility must include effective communications as mandatory training for direct care staff.

(b) Resident’s rights and facility responsibilities. A facility must ensure that staff members are educated on the rights of the resident and the responsibilities of a facility to properly care for its residents as set forth at §483.10, respectively.

(c) Abuse, neglect, and exploitation. In addition to the freedom from abuse, neglect, and exploitation requirements in §483.12, facilities must also provide training to their staff that at a minimum educates staff on—

(1) Activities that constitute abuse, neglect, exploitation, and misappropriation of resident property as set forth at §483.12.

(2) Procedures for reporting incidents of abuse, neglect, exploitation, or the misappropriation of resident property.

(3) Dementia management and resident abuse prevention.

(d) Quality assurance and performance improvement. A facility must include as part of its QAPI program mandatory training that outlines and informs staff of the elements and goals of the facility’s QAPI program as set forth at §483.75.

(e) Infection control. A facility must include as part of its infection prevention and control program mandatory training that includes the written standards, policies, and procedures for the program as described at §483.80(a)(2).

(f) Compliance and ethics. The operating organization for each facility must include as part of its compliance and ethics program, as set forth at §483.85

(1) An effective way to communicate that program’s standards, policies, and procedures through a training program or in another practical manner which explains the requirements under the program.

(2) Annual training if the operating organization operates five or more facilities.

(g) Required in-service training for nurse aides. In-service training must—

(1) Be sufficient to ensure the continuing competence of nurse aides, but must be no less than 12 hours per year.

(2) Include dementia management training and resident abuse prevention training.

(3) Address areas of weakness as determined in nurse aides’ performance reviews and facility assessment at §483.70(e) and may address the special needs of residents as determined by the facility staff.

(4) For nurse aides providing services to individuals with cognitive impairments, also address the care of the cognitively impaired.

(h) Required training of feeding assistants. A facility must not use any individual working in the facility as a paid feeding assistant unless that individual has successfully completed a State-approved training program for feeding assistants, as specified in §483.160.

(i) Behavioral health. A facility must provide behavioral health training consistent with the requirements at §483.40 and as determined by the facility assessment at §483.70(e).

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home training requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Physical Environment Regulations for Nursing Homes

Nursing Home Environment Requirements
Nursing Home Environment Requirements

Nursing Home Environment Requirements

Pursuant to federal regulations cited in  42 CFR § 483.90, physical environment, the facility must be designed, constructed, equipped, and maintained to protect the health and safety of residents, personnel and the public.

(a) Life safety from fire. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this section—

(i) The LTC facility must meet the applicable provisions and must proceed in accordance with the Life Safety Code (NFPA 101 and Tentative Interim Amendments TIA 12-1, TIA 12-2, TIA 12-3, and TIA 12-4.)

(ii) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section, corridor doors and doors to rooms containing flammable or combustible materials must be provided with positive latching hardware. Roller latches are prohibited on such doors.

(2) In consideration of a recommendation by the State survey agency or Accrediting Organization or at the discretion of the Secretary, may waive, for periods deemed appropriate, specific provisions of the Life Safety Code, which would result in unreasonable hardship upon a long-term care facility, but only if the waiver will not adversely affect the health and safety of the patients.

(3) The provisions of the Life safety Code do not apply in a State where CMS finds, in accordance with applicable provisions of sections 1819(d)(2)(B)(ii) and 1919(d)(2)(B)(ii) of the Act, that a fire and safety code imposed by State law adequately protects patients, residents and personnel in long term care facilities.

(4) A long-term care facility may install alcohol-based hand rub dispensers in its facility if the dispensers are installed in a manner that adequately protects against inappropriate access.

(5) A long term care facility must:

(i) Install, at least, battery-operated single station smoke alarms in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations in resident sleeping rooms and common areas.

(ii) Have a program for inspection, testing, maintenance, and battery replacement that conforms to the manufacturer’s recommendations and that verifies correct operation of the smoke alarms.

(iii) Exception:

(A) The facility has system-based smoke detectors in patient rooms and common areas that are installed, tested, and maintained in accordance with NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code, for system-based smoke detectors; or

(B) The facility is fully sprinklered in accordance with NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems.

(6) A long term care facility must:

(i) Install an approved, supervised automatic sprinkler system in accordance with the 1999 edition of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, as incorporated by reference, throughout the building by August 13, 2013. The Director of the Office of the Federal Register has approved the NFPA 13 1999 edition of the Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, issued July 22, 1999 for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy of the Code is available for inspection at the CMS Information Resource Center, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. Copies may be obtained from the National Fire Protection Association, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269.

(ii) Test, inspect, and maintain an approved, supervised automatic sprinkler system in accordance with the 1998 edition of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, as incorporated by reference. The Director of the Office of the Federal Register has approved the NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, 1998 edition, issued January 16, 1998 for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy of the Code is available for inspection at the CMS Information Resource Center, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. Copies may be obtained from the National Fire Protection Association, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269.

(iii) Subject to approval by CMS, a long term care facility may be granted an extension of the sprinkler installation deadline for a time period not to exceed 2 years from August 13, 2013, if the facility meets all of the following conditions:

(A) It is in the process of replacing its current building, or undergoing major modifications to improve the living conditions for residents in all unsprinklered living areas that requires the movement of corridor, room, partition, or structural walls or supports, in addition to the installation of a sprinkler system; or, has had its planned sprinkler installation so impaired by a disaster or emergency, as indicated by a declaration under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, that CMS finds it would be impractical to meet the sprinkler installation due date.

(B) It demonstrates that it has made the necessary financial commitments to complete the building replacement or modification; or pursuant to a declared disaster or emergency, CMS finds it impractical to make reasonable and necessary financial commitments.

(C) Before applying for the deadline extension, it has submitted plans to State and local authorities that are necessary for approval of the replacement building or major modification that includes the required sprinkler installation, and has received approval of the plans from State and local authorities.

(D) It agrees to complete interim steps to improve fire safety, as determined by CMS.

(iv) An extension granted under paragraph (a)(8)(iii) of this section may be renewed once, for an additional period not to exceed 1 year, if the following conditions are met:

(A) CMS finds that extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the facility will prevent full compliance with the provisions in paragraph (a)(8)(i) of this section by the end of the first waiver period.

(B) All other conditions of paragraph (a)(8)(iii) of this section are met.

(7) Buildings must have an outside window or outside door in every sleeping room, and for any building constructed after July 5, 2016 the sill height must not exceed 36 inches above the floor. Windows in atrium walls are considered outside windows for the purposes of this requirement.

(8) When a sprinkler system is shut down for more than 10 hours, the LTC facility must:

(i) Evacuate the building or portion of the building affected by the system outage until the system is back in service, or

(ii) Establish a fire watch until the system is back in service.

Additional Building and Environment Nursing Home Regulations

(b) Standard: Building safety. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the LTC facility must meet the applicable provisions and must proceed in accordance with the Health Care Facilities Code (NFPA 99 and Tentative Interim Amendments TIA 12-2, TIA 12-3, TIA 12-4, TIA 12-5 and TIA 12-6).

(1) Chapters 7, 8, 12, and 13 of the adopted Health Care Facilities Code do not apply to a LTC facility.

(2) If application of the Health Care Facilities Code required under paragraph (b) of this section would result in unreasonable hardship for the LTC facility, CMS may waive specific provisions of the Health Care Facilities Code, but only if the waiver does not adversely affect the health and safety of residents.

(c) Space and equipment. The facility must—

(1) Provide sufficient space and equipment in dining, health services, recreation, living, and program areas to enable staff to provide residents with needed services as required by these standards and as identified in each resident’s assessment and plan of care; and

(2) Maintain all mechanical, electrical, and patient care equipment in safe operating condition.

(3) Conduct regular inspection of all bed frames, mattresses, and bed rails, if any, as part of a regular maintenance program to identify areas of possible entrapment. When bed rails and mattresses are used and purchased separately from the bed frame, the facility must ensure that the bed rails, mattress, and bed frame are compatible.

(d) Space and equipment. The facility must—

(1) Provide sufficient space and equipment in dining, health services, recreation, and program areas to enable staff to provide residents with needed services as required by these standards and as identified in each resident’s plan of care; and

(2) Maintain all essential mechanical, electrical, and patient care equipment in safe operating condition.

(e) Resident rooms. Resident rooms must be designed and equipped for adequate nursing care, comfort, and privacy of residents.

(1) Bedrooms must—

(i) Accommodate no more than four residents. For facilities that receive approval of construction or reconstruction plans by State and local authorities or are newly certified after November 28, 2016, bedrooms must accommodate no more than two residents.

(ii) Measure at least 80 square feet per resident in multiple resident bedrooms, and at least 100 square feet in single resident rooms;

(iii) Have direct access to an exit corridor;

(iv) Be designed or equipped to assure full visual privacy for each resident;

(v) In facilities initially certified after March 31, 1992, except in private rooms, each bed must have ceiling suspended curtains, which extend around the bed to provide total visual privacy in combination with adjacent walls and curtains;

(vi) Have at least one window to the outside; and

(vii) Have a floor at or above grade level.

(2) The facility must provide each resident with—

(i) A separate bed of proper size and height for the safety and convenience of the resident;

(ii) A clean, comfortable mattress;

(iii) Bedding appropriate to the weather and climate; and

(iv) Functional furniture appropriate to the resident’s needs, and individual closet space in the resident’s bedroom with clothes racks and shelves accessible to the resident.

(3) CMS, or in the case of a nursing facility the survey agency, may permit variations in requirements specified in paragraphs (d)(1) (i) and (ii) of this section relating to rooms in individual cases when the facility demonstrates in writing that the variations—

(i) Are in accordance with the special needs of the residents; and

(ii) Will not adversely affect residents’ health and safety.

(f) Bathroom facilities. Each resident room must be equipped with or located near toilet and bathing facilities. For facilities that receive approval of construction from State and local authorities or are newly certified after November 28, 2016, each resident room must have its own bathroom equipped with at least a commode and sink.

(g) Resident call system. The facility must be adequately equipped to allow residents to call for staff assistance through a communication system which relays the call directly to a staff member or to a centralized staff work area from—

(1) Each resident’s bedside; and

(2) Toilet and bathing facilities.

(h) Dining and resident activities. The facility must provide one or more rooms designated for resident dining and activities. These rooms must—

(1) Be well lighted;

(2) Be well ventilated;

(3) Be adequately furnished; and

(4) Have sufficient space to accommodate all activities.

(i) Other environmental conditions. The facility must provide a safe, functional, sanitary, and comfortable environment for the residents, staff and the public. The facility must—

(1) Establish procedures to ensure that water is available to essential areas when there is a loss of normal water supply;

(2) Have adequate outside ventilation by means of windows, or mechanical ventilation, or a combination of the two;

(3) Equip corridors with firmly secured handrails on each side; and

(4) Maintain an effective pest control program so that the facility is free of pests and rodents.

(5) Establish policies, in accordance with applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, regarding smoking, smoking areas, and smoking safety that also take into account non-smoking residents.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home environment requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Federal Ethics and Compliance Mandates for Nursing Homes

Federal Nursing Home Ethics and Compliance Regulations
Federal Nursing Home Ethics and Compliance Regulations

Nursing Home Ethics and Compliance Federal Regulations

Pursuant to federal regulations 42 CFR § 483.85, compliance and ethics program (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:

Compliance and ethics program means, with respect to a facility, a program of the operating organization that—

(1) Has been reasonably designed, implemented, and enforced so that it is likely to be effective in preventing and detecting criminal, civil, and administrative violations under the Act and in promoting quality of care; and

(2) Includes, at a minimum, the required components specified in paragraph (c) of this section.
High-level personnel means individual(s) who have substantial control over the operating organization or who have a substantial role in the making of policy within the operating organization.
Operating organization means the individual(s) or entity that operates a facility.

(b) General rule. Beginning on November 28, 2017, the operating organization for each facility must have in operation a compliance and ethics program (as defined in paragraph (a) of this section) that meets the requirements of this section.

Additional Nursing Home Ethics Requirements

(c) Required components for all facilities. The operating organization for each facility must develop, implement, and maintain an effective compliance and ethics program that contains, at a minimum, the following components:

(1) Established written compliance and ethics standards, policies, and procedures to follow that are reasonably capable of reducing the prospect of criminal, civil, and administrative violations under the Act and promote quality of care, which include, but are not limited to, the designation of an appropriate compliance and ethics program contact to which individuals may report suspected violations, as well as an alternate method of reporting suspected violations anonymously without fear of retribution; and disciplinary standards that set out the consequences for committing violations for the operating organization’s entire staff; individuals providing services under a contractual arrangement; and volunteers, consistent with the volunteers’ expected roles.

(2) Assignment of specific individuals within the high-level personnel of the operating organization with the overall responsibility to oversee compliance with the operating organization’s compliance and ethics program’s standards, policies, and procedures, such as, but not limited to, the chief executive officer (CEO), members of the board of directors, or directors of major divisions in the operating organization.

(3) Sufficient resources and authority to the specific individuals designated in paragraph (c)(2) of this section to reasonably assure compliance with such standards, policies, and procedures.

(4) Due care not to delegate substantial discretionary authority to individuals who the operating organization knew, or should have known through the exercise of due diligence, had a propensity to engage in criminal, civil, and administrative violations under the Social Security Act.

(5) The facility takes steps to effectively communicate the standards, policies, and procedures in the operating organization’s compliance and ethics program to the operating organization’s entire staff; individuals providing services under a contractual arrangement; and volunteers, consistent with the volunteers’ expected roles. Requirements include, but are not limited to, mandatory participation in training as set forth at §483.95(f) or orientation programs, or disseminating information that explains in a practical manner what is required under the program.

(6) The facility takes reasonable steps to achieve compliance with the program’s standards, policies, and procedures. Such steps include, but are not limited to, utilizing monitoring and auditing systems reasonably designed to detect criminal, civil, and administrative violations under the Act by any of the operating organization’s staff, individuals providing services under a contractual arrangement, or volunteers, having in place and publicizing a reporting system whereby any of these individuals could report violations by others anonymously within the operating organization without fear of retribution, and having a process for ensuring the integrity of any reported data.

(7) Consistent enforcement of the operating organization’s standards, policies, and procedures through appropriate disciplinary mechanisms, including, as appropriate, discipline of individuals responsible for the failure to detect and report a violation to the compliance and ethics program contact identified in the operating organization’s compliance and ethics program.

(8) After a violation is detected, the operating organization must ensure that all reasonable steps identified in its program are taken to respond appropriately to the violation and to prevent further similar violations, including any necessary modification to the operating organization’s program to prevent and detect criminal, civil, and administrative violations under the Act.

(d) Additional required components for operating organizations with five or more facilities. In addition to all of the other requirements in paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (e) of this section, operating organizations that operate five or more facilities must also include, at a minimum, the following components in their compliance and ethics program:

(1) A mandatory annual training program on the operating organization’s compliance and ethics program that meets the requirements set forth in §483.95(f).

(2) A designated compliance officer for whom the operating organization’s compliance and ethics program is a major responsibility. This individual must report directly to the operating organization’s governing body and not be subordinate to the general counsel, chief financial officer or chief operating officer.

(3) Designated compliance liaisons located at each of the operating organization’s facilities.

(e) Annual review. The operating organization for each facility must review its compliance and ethics program annually and revise its program as needed to reflect changes in all applicable laws or regulations and within the operating organization and its facilities to improve its performance in deterring, reducing, and detecting violations under the Act and in promoting quality of care.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home ethics requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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