Minnesota Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Requirements for Nursing Homes

Federal Nursing Requirements for Nursing Homes

Federal Nursing Requirements for Nursing Homes

Federal Nursing Requirements for Nursing Homes

Pursuant to federal regulations 42 CFR § 483.35, nursing services.  The facility must have sufficient nursing staff with the appropriate competencies and skills sets to provide nursing and related services to assure resident safety and attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, as determined by resident assessments and individual plans of care and considering the number, acuity and diagnoses of the facility’s resident population in accordance with the facility assessment required at §483.70(e).

Under Section  of 42 CFR 483.35, Requirements Without Waiver

(e) Nursing facilities: Waiver of requirement to provide licensed nurses on a 24-hour basis. To the extent that a facility is unable to meet the requirements of paragraphs (a)(2) and (b)(1) of this section, a State may waive such requirements with respect to the facility if—

(1) The facility demonstrates to the satisfaction of the State that the facility has been unable, despite diligent efforts (including offering wages at the community prevailing rate for nursing facilities), to recruit appropriate personnel;
(2) The State determines that a waiver of the requirement will not endanger the health or safety of individuals staying in the facility;
(3) The State finds that, for any periods in which licensed nursing services are not available, a registered nurse or a physician is obligated to respond immediately to telephone calls from the facility;
(4) A waiver granted under the conditions listed in paragraph (c) of this section is subject to annual State review;
(5) In granting or renewing a waiver, a facility may be required by the State to use other qualified, licensed personnel;
(6) The State agency granting a waiver of such requirements provides notice of the waiver to the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman (established under section 712 of the Older Americans Act of 1965) and the protection and advocacy system in the State for individuals with a mental disorder who are eligible for such services as provided by the protection and advocacy agency; and
(7) The nursing facility that is granted such a waiver by a State notifies residents of the facility and their resident representatives of the waiver.

(f) SNFs: Waiver of the requirement to provide services of a registered nurse for more than 40 hours a week. (1) The Secretary may waive the requirement that a SNF provide the services of a registered nurse for more than 40 hours a week, including a director of nursing specified in paragraph (b) of this section, if the Secretary finds that—

(i) The facility is located in a rural area and the supply of skilled nursing facility services in the area is not sufficient to meet the needs of individuals residing in the area;
(ii) The facility has one full-time registered nurse who is regularly on duty at the facility 40 hours a week; and
(iii) The facility either—
(A) Has only patients whose physicians have indicated (through physicians’ orders or admission notes) that they do not require the services of a registered nurse or a physician for a 48-hours period, or
(B) Has made arrangements for a registered nurse or a physician to spend time at the facility, as determined necessary by the physician, to provide necessary skilled nursing services on days when the regular full-time registered nurse is not on duty;
(iv) The Secretary provides notice of the waiver to the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman (established under section 712 of the Older Americans Act of 1965) and the protection and advocacy system in the State for individuals with developmental disabilities or mental disorders; and
(v) The facility that is granted such a waiver notifies residents of the facility and their resident representatives of the waiver.
(2) A waiver of the registered nurse requirement under paragraph (d)(1) of this section is subject to annual renewal by the Secretary.

(g) Nurse staffing information—(1) Data requirements. The facility must post the following information on a daily basis:

(i) Facility name.
(ii) The current date.
(iii) The total number and the actual hours worked by the following categories of licensed and unlicensed nursing staff directly responsible for resident care per shift:
(A) Registered nurses.
(B) Licensed practical nurses or licensed vocational nurses (as defined under State law).
(C) Certified nurse aides.
(iv) Resident census.
(2) Posting requirements. (i) The facility must post the nurse staffing data specified in paragraph (e)(1) of this section on a daily basis at the beginning of each shift.
(ii) Data must be posted as follows:
(A) Clear and readable format.
(B) In a prominent place readily accessible to residents and visitors.
(3) Public access to posted nurse staffing data. The facility must, upon oral or written request, make nurse staffing data available to the public for review at a cost not to exceed the community standard.
(4) Facility data retention requirements. The facility must maintain the posted daily nurse staffing data for a minimum of 18 months, or as required by State law, whichever is greater.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Staff Requirements in Nursing Homes

Nursing Staff Requirments in Federally Funded Nursing Homes

Nursing Staff Requirements in Federally Funded Nursing Homes

Mandated Nursing Staff Requirments in Skilled Nursing Facilities

According to federal regulation 42 CFR § 483.35, nursing services.  The facility must have sufficient nursing staff with the appropriate competencies and skills sets to provide nursing and related services to assure resident safety and attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, as determined by resident assessments and individual plans of care and considering the number, acuity and diagnoses of the facility’s resident population in accordance with the facility assessment required at §483.70(e).

(a) Sufficient staff. (1) The facility must provide services by sufficient numbers of each of the following types of personnel on a 24-hour basis to provide nursing care to all residents in accordance with resident care plans:

(i) Except when waived under paragraph (e) of this section, licensed nurses; and

(ii) Other nursing personnel, including but not limited to nurse aides.

(2) Except when waived under paragraph (c) of this section, the facility must designate a licensed nurse to serve as a charge nurse on each tour of duty.

(3) The facility must ensure that licensed nurses have the specific competencies and skill sets necessary to care for residents’ needs, as identified through resident assessments, and described in the plan of care.

(4) Providing care includes but is not limited to assessing, evaluating, planning and implementing resident care plans and responding to resident’s needs.

(b) Registered nurse. (1) Except when waived under paragraph (e) or (f) of this section, the facility must use the services of a registered nurse for at least 8 consecutive hours a day, 7 days a week.
(2) Except when waived under paragraph (e) or (f) of this section, the facility must designate a registered nurse to serve as the director of nursing on a full time basis.
(3) The director of nursing may serve as a charge nurse only when the facility has an average daily occupancy of 60 or fewer residents.

(c) Proficiency of nurse aides. The facility must ensure that nurse aides are able to demonstrate competency in skills and techniques necessary to care for residents’ needs, as identified through resident assessments, and described in the plan of care.

(d) Requirements for facility hiring and use of nursing aides—(1) General rule. A facility must not use any individual working in the facility as a nurse aide for more than 4 months, on a full-time basis, unless—

(i) That individual is competent to provide nursing and nursing related services; and

(ii)(A) That individual has completed a training and competency evaluation program, or a competency evaluation program approved by the State as meeting the requirements of §§483.151 through 483.154; or

(B) That individual has been deemed or determined competent as provided in §483.150(a) and (b).

Additional Nursing Staffing Requirements

(2) Non-permanent employees. A facility must not use on a temporary, per diem, leased, or any basis other than a permanent employee any individual who does not meet the requirements in paragraphs (d)(1) (i) and (ii) of this section.

(3) Minimum competency. A facility must not use any individual who has worked less than 4 months as a nurse aide in that facility unless the individual—

(i) Is a full-time employee in a State-approved training and competency evaluation program;

(ii) Has demonstrated competence through satisfactory participation in a State-approved nurse aide training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program; or

(iii) Has been deemed or determined competent as provided in §483.150(a) and (b).

(4) Registry verification. Before allowing an individual to serve as a nurse aide, a facility must receive registry verification that the individual has met competency evaluation requirements unless—

(i) The individual is a full-time employee in a training and competency evaluation program approved by the State; or

(ii) The individual can prove that he or she has recently successfully completed a training and competency evaluation program or competency evaluation program approved by the State and has not yet been included in the registry. Facilities must follow up to ensure that such an individual actually becomes registered.

(5) Multi-State registry verification. Before allowing an individual to serve as a nurse aide, a facility must seek information from every State registry established under sections 1819(e)(2)(A) or 1919(e)(2)(A) of the Act that the facility believes will include information on the individual.

(6) Required retraining. If, since an individual’s most recent completion of a training and competency evaluation program, there has been a continuous period of 24 consecutive months during none of which the individual provided nursing or nursing-related services for monetary compensation, the individual must complete a new training and competency evaluation program or a new competency evaluation program.

(7) Regular in-service education. The facility must complete a performance review of every nurse aide at least once every 12 months, and must provide regular in-service education based on the outcome of these reviews. In-service training must comply with the requirements of §483.95(g).

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing staff requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Physician Services Must Be Included in Nursing Home Care

Physician Services are Required for Nursing Homes

Physician Services are Required for Nursing Homes

Required Physician Services in Nursing Homes

Pursuant to federal regulations 42 CFR § 483.30, physician services.  A physician must personally approve in writing a recommendation that an individual be admitted to a facility. Each resident must remain under the care of a physician. A physician, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist must provide orders for the resident’s immediate care and needs.

(a) Physician supervision. The facility must ensure that—

(1) The medical care of each resident is supervised by a physician; and
(2) Another physician supervises the medical care of residents when their attending physician is unavailable.
(b) Physician visits. The physician must—
(1) Review the resident’s total program of care, including medications and treatments, at each visit required by paragraph (c) of this section;
(2) Write, sign, and date progress notes at each visit; and
(3) Sign and date all orders with the exception of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, which may be administered per physician-approved facility policy after an assessment for contraindications.

Timing of Nursing Home Physician Services

(c) Frequency of physician visits. (1) The resident must be seen by a physician at least once every 30 days for the first 90 days after admission, and at least once every 60 days thereafter.

(2) A physician visit is considered timely if it occurs not later than 10 days after the date the visit was required.
(3) Except as provided in paragraphs (c)(4) and (f) of this section, all required physician visits must be made by the physician personally.
(4) At the option of the physician, required visits in SNFs after the initial visit may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section.

(d) Availability of physicians for emergency care. The facility must provide or arrange for the provision of physician services 24 hours a day, in case of an emergency.

(e) Physician delegation of tasks in SNFs. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (e)(4) of this section, a physician may delegate tasks to a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist who—

(i) Meets the applicable definition in §491.2 of this chapter or, in the case of a clinical nurse specialist, is licensed as such by the State;

(ii) Is acting within the scope of practice as defined by State law; and
(iii) Is under the supervision of the physician.
(2) A resident’s attending physician may delegate the task of writing dietary orders, consistent with §483.60, to a qualified dietitian or other clinically qualified nutrition professional who—
(i) Is acting within the scope of practice as defined by State law; and
(ii) Is under the supervision of the physician.
(3) A resident’s attending physician may delegate the task of writing therapy orders, consistent with §483.65, to a qualified therapist who—
(i) Is acting within the scope of practice as defined by State law; and
(ii) Is under the supervision of the physician.
(4) A physician may not delegate a task when the regulations specify that the physician must perform it personally, or when the delegation is prohibited under State law or by the facility’s own policies.

(f) Performance of physician tasks in NFs. At the option of the State, any required physician task in a NF (including tasks which the regulations specify must be performed personally by the physician) may also be satisfied when performed by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, or physician assistant who is not an employee of the facility but who is working in collaboration with a physician.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home physician services requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Residents Must Have Quality of Care Provided by Nursing Homes

 

Residents Have the Right to Receive Quality Care from Nursing Home Facility Staff

Residents Have the Right to Receive Quality Care from Nursing Home Facility Staff

Residents Have the Right to Quality Care from Nursing Home

According to 42 CFR § 483.25, quality care is a fundamental principle that applies to all treatment and care provided to facility residents. Based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that residents receive treatment and care in accordance with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the resident’s choices, including but not limited to the following:

(a) Vision and hearing. To ensure that residents receive proper treatment and assistive devices to maintain vision and hearing abilities, the facility must, if necessary, assist the resident—

(1) In making appointments, and

(2) By arranging for transportation to and from the office of a practitioner specializing in the treatment of vision or hearing impairment or the office of a professional specializing in the provision of vision or hearing assistive devices.

(b) Skin integrity—(1) Pressure ulcers. Based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that—

(i) A resident receives care, consistent with professional standards of practice, to prevent pressure ulcers and does not develop pressure ulcers unless the individual’s clinical condition demonstrates that they were unavoidable; and

(ii) A resident with pressure ulcers receives necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.

(2) Foot care. To ensure that residents receive proper treatment and care to maintain mobility and good foot health, the facility must—

(i) Provide foot care and treatment, in accordance with professional standards of practice, including to prevent complications from the resident’s medical condition(s) and

(ii) If necessary, assist the resident in making appointments with a qualified person, and arranging for transportation to and from such appointments.

(c) Mobility. (1) The facility must ensure that a resident who enters the facility without limited range of motion does not experience reduction in range of motion unless the resident’s clinical condition demonstrates that a reduction in range of motion is unavoidable; and

(2) A resident with limited range of motion receives appropriate treatment and services to increase range of motion and/or to prevent further decrease in range of motion.

(3) A resident with limited mobility receives appropriate services, equipment, and assistance to maintain or improve mobility with the maximum practicable independence unless a reduction in mobility is demonstrably unavoidable.

Additional 42 CFR 483.25 Requirements for Quality Care

(d) Accidents. The facility must ensure that—

(1) The resident environment remains as free of accident hazards as is possible; and

(2) Each resident receives adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.

(e) Incontinence. (1) The facility must ensure that a resident who is continent of bladder and bowel on admission receives services and assistance to maintain continence unless his or her clinical condition is or becomes such that continence is not possible to maintain.

(2) For a resident with urinary incontinence, based on the resident’s comprehensive assessment, the facility must ensure that—

(i) A resident who enters the facility without an indwelling catheter is not catheterized unless the resident’s clinical condition demonstrates that catheterization was necessary;

(ii) A resident who enters the facility with an indwelling catheter or subsequently receives one is assessed for removal of the catheter as soon as possible unless the resident’s clinical condition demonstrates that catheterization is necessary, and

(iii) A resident who is incontinent of bladder receives appropriate treatment and services to prevent urinary tract infections and to restore continence to the extent possible.
(3) For a resident with fecal incontinence, based on the resident’s comprehensive assessment, the facility must ensure that a resident who is incontinent of bowel receives appropriate treatment and services to restore as much normal bowel function as possible.

(f) Colostomy, urostomy, or ileostomy care. The facility must ensure that residents who require colostomy, urostomy, or ileostomy services, receive such care consistent with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the residents’ goals and preferences.

(g) Assisted nutrition and hydration. (Includes naso-gastric and gastrostomy tubes, both percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy, and enteral fluids). Based on a resident’s comprehensive assessment, the facility must ensure that a resident—

(1) Maintains acceptable parameters of nutritional status, such as usual body weight or desirable body weight range and electrolyte balance, unless the resident’s clinical condition demonstrates that this is not possible or resident preferences indicate otherwise;

(2) Is offered sufficient fluid intake to maintain proper hydration and health; and

(3) Is offered a therapeutic diet when there is a nutritional problem and the health care provider orders a therapeutic diet.

(4) A resident who has been able to eat enough alone or with assistance is not fed by enteral methods unless the resident’s clinical condition demonstrates that enteral feeding was clinically indicated and consented to by the resident; and

(5) A resident who is fed by enteral means receives the appropriate treatment and services to restore, if possible, oral eating skills and to prevent complications of enteral feeding including but not limited to aspiration pneumonia, diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, metabolic abnormalities, and nasal-pharyngeal ulcers.

(h) Parenteral fluids. Parenteral fluids must be administered consistent with professional standards of practice and in accordance with physician orders, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the resident’s goals and preferences.

(i) Respiratory care, including tracheostomy care and tracheal suctioning. The facility must ensure that a resident who needs respiratory care, including tracheostomy care and tracheal suctioning, is provided such care, consistent with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, the residents’ goals and preferences, and §483.65 of this subpart.

(j) Prostheses. The facility must ensure that a resident who has a prosthesis is provided care and assistance, consistent with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the residents’ goals and preferences, to wear and be able to use the prosthetic device.

(k) Pain management. The facility must ensure that pain management is provided to residents who require such services, consistent with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the residents’ goals and preferences.

(l) Dialysis. The facility must ensure that residents who require dialysis receive such services, consistent with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the residents’ goals and preferences.

(m) Trauma-informed care. The facility must ensure that residents who are trauma survivors receive culturally-competent, trauma-informed care in accordance with professional standards of practice and accounting for residents’ experiences and preferences in order to eliminate or mitigate triggers that may cause re-traumatization of the resident.

(n) Bed rails. The facility must attempt to use appropriate alternatives prior to installing a side or bed rail. If a bed or side rail is used, the facility must ensure correct installation, use, and maintenance of bed rails, including but not limited to the following elements.

(1) Assess the resident for risk of entrapment from bed rails prior to installation.
(2) Review the risks and benefits of bed rails with the resident or resident representative and obtain informed consent prior to installation.
(3) Ensure that the bed’s dimensions are appropriate for the resident’s size and weight.
(4) Follow the manufacturers’ recommendations and specifications for installing and maintaining bed rails.

Common areas of cases I see include:  Falls from Beds, Hoyer Lifts and in the Bathroom; Sexual Abuse; Medication Errors and Others.  STOP ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT!

For more information about nursing home care requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Quality of Life is a Central Requirment for Nursing Homes

Nursing Homes Must Ensure a Quality of Life for Residents

Nursing Homes Must Ensure a Quality of Life for Residents

Residents Must Receive Highest Quality of Life Practicable

According to 42 CFR § 483.24, quality of life is a fundamental principle that applies to all care and services provided to facility residents. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, consistent with the resident’s comprehensive assessment and plan of care.

(a) Based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident and consistent with the resident’s needs and choices, the facility must provide the necessary care and services to ensure that a resident’s abilities in activities of daily living do not diminish unless circumstances of the individual’s clinical condition demonstrate that such diminution was unavoidable. This includes the facility ensuring that:

(1) A resident is given the appropriate treatment and services to maintain or improve his or her ability to carry out the activities of daily living, including those specified in paragraph (b) of this section,
(2) A resident who is unable to carry out activities of daily living receives the necessary services to maintain good nutrition, grooming, and personal and oral hygiene, and
(3) Personnel provide basic life support, including CPR, to a resident requiring such emergency care prior to the arrival of emergency medical personnel and subject to related physician orders and the resident’s advance directives.
(b) Activities of daily living. The facility must provide care and services in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section for the following activities of daily living:
(1) Hygiene—bathing, dressing, grooming, and oral care,
(2) Mobility—transfer and ambulation, including walking,
(3) Elimination—toileting,
(4) Dining—eating, including meals and snacks,
(5) Communication, including
(i) Speech,
(ii) Language,
(iii) Other functional communication systems.
(c) Activities. (1) The facility must provide, based on the comprehensive assessment and care plan and the preferences of each resident, an ongoing program to support residents in their choice of activities, both facility-sponsored group and individual activities and independent activities, designed to meet the interests of and support the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, encouraging both independence and interaction in the community.

Nursing Home Must Ensure Resident Quality of Life

(2) The activities program must be directed by a qualified professional who is a qualified therapeutic recreation specialist or an activities professional who—

(i) Is licensed or registered, if applicable, by the State in which practicing; and
(ii) Is:
(A) Eligible for certification as a therapeutic recreation specialist or as an activities professional by a recognized accrediting body on or after October 1, 1990; or
(B) Has 2 years of experience in a social or recreational program within the last 5 years, one of which was full-time in a therapeutic activities program; or
(C) Is a qualified occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant; or
(D) Has completed a training course approved by the State.

For more information about resident quality of life requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Minnesota Nursing Home Lawyer

MINNESOTA ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT LAWYER - MN Nursing Home Law


Kenneth L. LaBore, Esq, Phone: 612-743-9048 or Toll Free: 1-888-452-6589


This web site is designed for general information only. The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Minnesota Nursing Home Lawyer & Attorney of Kenneth LaBore - Attorney at Law, offering services related to elder abuse and neglect, nursing home, assisting living, and other senior or elder care facilities, serving Minneapolis, St Paul, Twin Cities, Bemidji, Rochester, Alexandria, Marshall, Grand Rapids, Anoka, Apple Valley, Arden Hills, Burnsville, Lakeville, St Cloud, Monticello, Duluth, Owatonna, Austin, Bloomington, Mankato and throughout Minnesota.


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