Minnesota Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore 1-888-452-6589

Discharge Plan Must Be Created for Residents

Nursing Homes Must Have Discharge Plan for Residents

Nursing Homes Must Have Discharge Plan for Residents

Facilities Must Have Discharge Plan for Residents

According to 42 CFR 483.21(2)(c) Discharge planning—(1) Discharge planning process. The facility must develop and implement an effective discharge planning process that focuses on the resident’s discharge goals, the preparation of residents to be active partners and effectively transition them to post-discharge care, and the reduction of factors leading to preventable readmissions. The facility’s discharge planning process must be consistent with the discharge rights set forth at §483.15(b) as applicable and—

(i) Ensure that the discharge needs of each resident are identified and result in the development of a discharge plan for each resident.
(ii) Include regular re-evaluation of residents to identify changes that require modification of the discharge plan. The discharge plan must be updated, as needed, to reflect these changes.
(iii) Involve the interdisciplinary team, as defined by §483.21(b)(2)(ii), in the ongoing process of developing the discharge plan.
(iv) Consider caregiver/support person availability and the resident’s or caregiver’s/support person(s) capacity and capability to perform required care, as part of the identification of discharge needs.
(v) Involve the resident and resident representative in the development of the discharge plan and inform the resident and resident representative of the final plan.
(vi) Address the resident’s goals of care and treatment preferences.
(vii) Document that a resident has been asked about their interest in receiving information regarding returning to the community.
(A) If the resident indicates an interest in returning to the community, the facility must document any referrals to local contact agencies or other appropriate entities made for this purpose.
(B) Facilities must update a resident’s comprehensive care plan and discharge plan, as appropriate, in response to information received from referrals to local contact agencies or other appropriate entities.
(C) If discharge to the community is determined to not be feasible, the facility must document who made the determination and why.
(viii) For residents who are transferred to another SNF or who are discharged to a HHA, IRF, or LTCH, assist residents and their resident representatives in selecting a post-acute care provider by using data that includes, but is not limited to SNF, HHA, IRF, or LTCH standardized patient assessment data, data on quality measures, and data on resource use to the extent the data is available. The facility must ensure that the post-acute care standardized patient assessment data, data on quality measures, and data on resource use is relevant and applicable to the resident’s goals of care and treatment preferences.
(ix) Document, complete on a timely basis based on the resident’s needs, and include in the clinical record, the evaluation of the resident’s discharge needs and discharge plan. The results of the evaluation must be discussed with the resident or resident’s representative. All relevant resident information must be incorporated into the discharge plan to facilitate its implementation and to avoid unnecessary delays in the resident’s discharge or transfer.

Nursing Homes Must Have Discharge Summary

(2) Discharge summary. When the facility anticipates discharge a resident must have a discharge summary that includes, but is not limited to, the following:

(i) A recapitulation of the resident’s stay that includes, but is not limited to, diagnoses, course of illness/treatment or therapy, and pertinent lab, radiology, and consultation results.
(ii) A final summary of the resident’s status to include items in paragraph (b)(1) of §483.20, at the time of the discharge that is available for release to authorized persons and agencies, with the consent of the resident or resident’s representative.
(iii) Reconciliation of all pre-discharge medications with the resident’s post-discharge medications (both prescribed and over-the-counter).
(iv) A post-discharge plan of care that is developed with the participation of the resident and, with the resident’s consent, the resident representative(s), which will assist the resident to adjust to his or her new living environment. The post-discharge plan of care must indicate where the individual plans to reside, any arrangements that have been made for the resident’s follow up care and any post-discharge medical and non-medical services

For more information about resident assessment and discharge planning requirements or other questions about elder abuse and neglect contact Nursing Home Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore @ MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Minnesota Nursing Home Lawyer

MINNESOTA ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT LAWYER - MN Nursing Home Law


Kenneth L. LaBore, Esq, Phone: 612-743-9048 or Toll Free: 1-888-452-6589


This web site is designed for general information only. The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Minnesota Nursing Home Lawyer & Attorney of Kenneth LaBore - Attorney at Law, offering services related to elder abuse and neglect, nursing home, assisting living, and other senior or elder care facilities, serving Minneapolis, St Paul, Twin Cities, Bemidji, Rochester, Alexandria, Marshall, Grand Rapids, Anoka, Apple Valley, Arden Hills, Burnsville, Lakeville, St Cloud, Monticello, Duluth, Owatonna, Austin, Bloomington, Mankato and throughout Minnesota.


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